Friday (Small Business) Favorites: December Edition

**I did not receive any compensation for this post—all of these products were purchased and enjoyed by me/my family (or wrapped and saved for gifts).

Good morning friends! I’m so excited to share another Friday favorites post with you (check out the first one here) featuring some of my favorite purchases from around the craft show scene this past month (really, the past few months–October and November were so crazy that I never did get my favorites up for those months, so this is a combo of all of them! I’ve been writing this post for weeks now…).

It’s still early enough for some last minute Christmas shopping, right? Get your orders in for these great items ASAP–there are some awesome stocking stuffer ideas in this post!

Today I want to feature my friends at Green Bubble Gorgeous, Backroad Divas, Sweetnswag, Maybee Lane Designs, and Blue Kangaroo Handmade.

Green Bubble Gorgeous Scrub

  1. Mango Pomegranate Polishing Sugar Scrub, Green Bubble Gorgeous, ($14)

I’ve actually been buying Green Bubble Gorgeous, and this scrub in particular, for a few years now, both in person and through their Etsy shop. It’s my most favorite scrub ever, and, like a lot of girls, I’m obsessed with bath products, so I’ve tried a ton of them.

I have to have a scrub around at all times with the amount of wax that I use on my furniture pieces–and you know that even when you’re using a brush, that stuff gets all over your hands, and it coats your skin like it coats that furniture, baby. I love what I do, but wax is the worst, friends. It’s nice when it’s had time to cure and make the piece super pretty, but no matter how easy it is to work with, it’s still kind of the pits.

I love my Mango Pomegranate scrub (a slight departure from my peach obsession, but really, not that far away) because it polishes and removes old skin and whatever else is on my hands (read: wax), but it doesn’t leave a residue like a lot of other scrubs do–my hands actually feel clean after I use this product, instead of extra oily.

You can find GBG on their Facebook page and website as well as their Etsy shop to check out all of their amazing products. I’m so excited to have run into them at Hocus Pocus in October. Just writing about this scrub makes me want to head to the bathroom and get some on my hands, so…excuse me one second.

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  1. Raspberry Sangria Candle, Country Candlelight ($8)

Look at this, friends! Another departure from my peach obsession. I’ll let you in on another secret about me–I’m also very, very fond of sangria scented things, as well. And sangria. My all-time favorite candle is probably the Sangria scent from the REWINED line, which I’m not seeing on their website at the moment…I hope that means it’s seasonal and they haven’t stopped making it. I would probably cry a little. While drinking Sangria.

*Update: I think it is seasonal, because I found one on sale at Caddywampus on Mackinac Island when I was there in October, so I think we’re good.

Back to the Raspberry Sangria candle. I was burning it the other day (the other month, now), one of the first semi-chilly days in October, and it was super rainy and gross feeling outside. I especially love candles on days like that–they are my fireplace substitute until I get my “real” house with the big fireplace in the living room. I’m living in my fake house right now, folks.

I found this candle at the Backroad Divas tent at Hocus Pocus in Monroe, and I can’t find much reliable information about them online–I think the name “Country Candlelight” is being used by a few different people, so it’s hard to know for sure. I hesitated to even share this one because I didn’t want to share a product that was super hard to find, but the Backroad Divas said to get in touch since they carry these candles pretty regularly. To be honest, I smelled the Raspberry Sangria and didn’t even stop to check out the other scents they had–this one just smelled so darn good, I had to pick it up.

Sweetnswag moccs

  1. Anchors Away Baby Moccasins, Sweetnswag, ($20)

Charlotte had an adorable pair of these when she was just starting to walk, and when I saw these super sweet striped ones at Finder’s Keeper’s in August, I had to get them for my best friend’s baby, Harper. Harper turned one at the beginning of October, and they were the perfect accessory to get with the cute fall outfit that  Charlotte helped me pick out. Can you just not with these baby moto jeans from Target? I got a matching pair for her, but she’s way too skinny for them, sadly. They are actual jeans, which are a no-go for her, since she is a little bean pole who can only wear tights and leggings (and sometimes even those are too big in the waist!). I can tell I have some wardrobe struggles coming up with this girl.

I love moccasins for babies because they are stretchy and comfy and they don’t squeeze little feet–I feel like it’s a much easier transition than going straight into a pair of sneakers. Moccasins are perfect for littles just starting to walk or even those who are starting to pull themselves up on furniture. Charlotte was always taking socks and slippers off, but for some reason she seemed to enjoy her mocs a little bit more than the cute regular shoes I would buy her.

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  1. home. Michigan Wall Art, Maybee Lane Designs, $12

This is another purchase that I made for the Bellaire house…I should probably hit the pause button on these purchases and concentrate a little bit more on my kitchen makeover…yeah, that’s right, the one I started back in September. Early September.

This is another Hocus Pocus purchase–friends, can you tell I had a LOT of fun shopping there?

I love all things Michigan, and this one just spoke to me. It seems like everyone is really getting into the modern calligraphy-type fonts on wall art and other pieces, and I am no stranger to the love of that pretty writing. Maybee Lane Designs had a ton of pretty pieces in their booth, and I had my eye on a little bakery sign there, too. I thought her prices were really good, and I’ll be keeping an eye out for her booth for future Christmas gifts and decor ideas.

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  1. Large Wet Bag in Fox, Blue Kangaroo Handmade, $25.18

Charlotte has been in swim lessons at Goldfish Swim School in Rochester since the beginning of the summer, and I finally broke down and bought a wet bag in early November, after complaining about having a soggy swim bag all summer. I used cloth diapers for her for her first year, so I had one small wet bag that came with some of my old Charlie Banannas, but it wasn’t great for a soaking wet swimsuit.

This wet bag from Blue Kangaroo Handmade’s Etsy shop keeps our things dry and is super cute–plus, it’s way larger than my old wet bag–big enough to fit both of our suits on the days when we stay for family swim at Goldfish. We are into all things woodland right now, so I wasn’t surprised when Charlotte picked this one from the huge selection on Etsy.


I’d love it if you would join me in shopping small this Christmas season! If you’re on Instagram, tag me @wildanddaisy and use the hashtag #metrodetroitmaker to show me what you got! I’m not above stealing a really good idea for a Christmas gift, and I have so much fun spoiling friends and families with handmade finds and all-natural products.

What are your favorite small shops this fall? Let me know in the comments!

Talk soon,

Jessie

 

Meet Your Maker: An Interview with Emma Carley from By Emma, With Love

Good morning girl bosses! Today I’m so pleased to introduce you to Emma Carley, a fellow girl boss from the twin cities and a dear Instagram friend, in a post that is part Meet Your Maker and part craft show review, plus a lot of fun.

Since I’m on a quick break from craft shows for the next few weeks, I thought it would be fun to share Emma’s thoughts and advice with you today, since she just finished her very first in person event two weekends ago.

Emma runs her Etsy shop and website By Emma, With Love, and when she was prepping for her first show, I happened to see a post or two on Instagram about it. I wanted to reach out and share my blog with her in case, by some chance, there was anything that might be even remotely valuable to her, and she generously offered to do a quick interview about her very first event, which is super exciting to me for a couple of reasons.

First, it’s been so long since my first event that I have a hard time tapping into what it was like to make that leap, and I want to be able to serve girl bosses in the early stages of their business and craft show career, as well as those who have been doing this for a while.

The second reason that I’m excited to introduce you to Emma is that I’m seriously so impressed by the time and effort that she put into making her very first event so successful. Seriously, I don’t know how her booth looks this amazing, and I am so, so glad that I don’t have pictures from my first event, which was a hot mess, friends. After 50+ shows, I still haven’t got my set-up totally figured out, so the fact that this is her very first show and her booth looks this incredible blows me away.

*All photo credits to Emma Carley.

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Without further ado, Emma Carley from By Emma, With Love:

#mdm: How did you make the decision to do your very first show?

We live in a very small town, and our neighbor is on the city council and happened to be the organizer of the vendors for our local town festival. She knows about my blog and Etsy shop, so she approached me and asked if I’d be interested in having a booth. I hadn’t really thought about it before, since typically I only make a couple pieces at a time, and do mostly custom orders for people, but I was immediately intrigued!! I decided it would be a great opportunity to build up a product inventory, get my name out there and hopefully build my little business a bit!

#mdm: What specific things did you do to prepare? What ended up being the most important thing you did to prepare?

I realized that there were so many logistical things that needed to be done for a physical sale versus my online business. I had business cards made, got set up with a Square card reader, bought tags, bags, receipts, and all the other business-type things that I would need. It was actually a great motivator to put some time into the more tedious and less creative aspects of my business!

#mdm: How did you go about putting your booth together? Did you practice beforehand? Design specific elements for display? Did you booth end up how you envisioned it?

I definitely had a picture in my head of how I wanted my booth to look, but had to get a bit creative since I didn’t want to spend a whole lot of money on the display. I set it all up in my dining room the week leading up to the show, and took pictures of it, so that when it came time to set up at the show I was able to quickly put everything in the right place.

I’m especially proud of the display wall I made out of a few plywood panels and some extra paint I had lying around – we don’t have a pickup truck, just a small SUV, so I knew that I’d have to get a bit creative with my display. I was able to design two walls that easily fold down and fit in the back of my SUV, which worked perfectly! I also used fabric buntings that I had leftover from my wedding to beautify the wall and my whole booth a little bit, which ended up being perfect for my branding and display.

I found a $15 spool table at Goodwill, and an adorable vintage folding table on Craigslist that also fit nicely in my car and worked perfectly with the aesthetic of my booth. It all ended up coming together really well, and I’m super proud of my booth display!

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I’d say she deserves to be proud about this booth!! It’s fabulous!

#mdm: Tell us about the show!

The show was a bit of a hybrid for our town festival – it was outside right on the downtown strip, and was equal parts antique car show, food trucks, craft fair, and small shop displays. A lot of the other booths were very different from mine (think LulaRoe, Pampered Chef, essential oils, jewelry, etc.) which was nice since I wasn’t really competing with anyone selling similar items. I had a 10×10 space, so I invested in a 10×10 pop-up canopy, and was responsible for bringing everything for the display myself. The downtown spot I reserved was $40, which was super reasonable!

The hours of the sale were 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., but we definitely had a slow start to the day. It was actually pretty discouraging for awhile, since very few people even stopped by the booth, let alone bought anything. I didn’t have any real customers until about 11, but then it got very busy, very fast! Most of my sales happened between 11 and 2.

#mdm: What were you surprised by?

The amount I sold!! I didn’t have a huge inventory going in: I made around 30 signs, and also had 10 mugs, a couple decorative trays, and a bunch of keychains that I made as mostly just a bonus. I went in to the sale with a very realistic approach – our town demographic, especially for a car show, isn’t necessarily my demographic, so I really didn’t know how much interest I would get. I also haven’t sold at a show before, so I saw this opportunity as a chance for exposure and research more than anything, to see what people liked most and what I should make more of.

I was pleasantly surprised! I sold around half of my inventory, and also got a lot of interest for custom orders and even from a couple local shop owners who want to buy some of my products for their stores.

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#mdm: What was the most important thing that you learned from doing your first show?

You have to know your demographic! Since I haven’t done a show before, I made a little bit of everything: a lot of cute home type signs, a few coffee and wine-related signs (of course), and some local-focused signs (Minnesota and Wisconsin art, signs about river towns, etc.). Without a doubt, my location related products sold the best. I actually had two people buy signs that were unfinished that I brought to work on during the day, and finished them while the customers were shopping!

I also definitely learned the importance of authenticity. I know that when I’m at a show as a customer, nothing turns me away from a booth faster than an over-eager or “salesy” shop owner. Instead, I tried to have very authentic conversations with the customers, and I think that’s probably the reason for my success.

#mdm: How do you think in-person events will factor into your business plan in the future?

I was approached a couple weeks ago from an event organizer who asked me to sell at an event at an apple orchard at the end of September. Since I already have my display arranged, and I figured I’d have leftover inventory from this show, I said yes!

In general, though, I’m not sure how many shows I’ll do. I definitely loved getting the face-to-face contact with customers, and it was really fun to set up a display, but it was also a ton of work, and between school, my blog, my Etsy site and my weekend wedding job, it took over my life for a little bit. I’ll probably keep shows on the back burner for now, as a mostly summertime way to supplement my online business and get some exposure and feedback.

In general, though, I’m definitely open to and hoping for more selling experiences!

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#mdm: What else can you tell the readers about doing an event for the first time? Do you have any advice? Insight? Encouragement?

If you’re not sure if you’re quite ready, take the leap and try it out! It’s a great way to push yourself past your comfort zone a little bit, and gain business experience and make connections. I think my biggest insight was that you never know exactly what you’re going to get at your first event. Going in as prepared as possible and with an open mind will ensure that you have the best experience possible. Also, keeping realistic expectations helps keep you from being discouraged. I went into the show simply hoping to meet some local people, get exposure for my business, see what people liked and hopefully make a little bit of money, so the sales I made exceeded my expectations. Now I know a little better how to prepare for my next show, which is so valuable.

One of the things I did during the show that ended up being really successful was bringing a couple unfinished pieces to the show with me to work on during slow times. It was mostly just out of necessity, since I hadn’t had time to finish them all in time, but I actually ended up selling two pieces before they were finished because customers saw me working on them, and wanted the finished product! If it’s possible for your business, working on one of your pieces during the show is a way to show your customers the handmade nature of the product, and they can see how much time and effort you put into each and every piece. It was also a great conversation starter!

Another of my concerns going into the show was that no one would like my stuff – putting your own artwork that you’ve put so much of yourself into on display is nerve-wracking and a bit scary, and I was nervous that I’d get criticism or at least indifference. Luckily, the people who stopped my my booth were all incredibly kind and supportive, and it reminded me that we’re all our own worst critic! If you make a product that is high-quality, and you have authentic interactions with your customers, you’ll have a great experience and also hopefully make some money!

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Isn’t she the best? Girls, I think Emma’s advice is so valuable, and the amount of effort that she put into her booth display is still so impressive to me for a very first show! I was definitely not this aware of my brand/image when I started doing this!

I know we can all also relate to the fact that we have so many demands on our time, that doing these events takes over our lives for a bit! Between creating new inventory, stocking up on things like bags, tags, and display pieces, and planning how you’re going to get all that stuff to the actual event, who has time for real life, “real” jobs, and necessities like laundry and cooking dinner? I know I don’t. Planning ahead and getting the prep work done a little at a time is definitely essential.

Is there anyone else out there who recently did her very first event? How did it go? And for those of you who started a long time ago (like, before Pinterest was really a thing and there were basically no resources), how does your very first event compare with Emma’s? Are you ladies as blown away as I am?

A huge thank you and congrats to Emma for sharing this awesome experience with us! Here’s where you can connect with her online on her Instagram, blog, and Etsy shop, since we are a little bit far apart in real life.

Until next time friends!

Talk soon,

Jessie

Vintage Market Review: MI Junkstock in Richmond, MI

Hello friends! I’m excited to share my experience out in Richmond this past weekend with everyone today—after this week, I’m taking a much needed break from doing shows (for three glorious weeks!!), so I am really looking forward to that, especially after a show where I was sick the whole weekend!

I am still a little burned out this morning—not to complain, but after a weekend-long show, fighting a cold (right now I can’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t have a sinus headache), Charlotte’s first gymnastics class (which I bought a leotard for about 10 hours before the class, which was absolutely not my plan!!) and her first day of preschool on Monday, excuse me while I sit back and enjoy an hour of just sipping coffee and doing….nothing (except editing and publishing this post, that is).

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MI Junkstock was put on by Kathy of MI Junktiques in Richmond—her store is full of great painted pieces, vintage finds, and salvage items that can be turned into amazing new pieces, so if you are into DIY and don’t mind a really pretty drive through the country, you should go check her out. I haven’t tried her line of paint yet, but I’ve heard great things from Danielle of Tillie Jean Market, and I’m excited to try it the next time I’m out that way. You know me–I love, love, love Annie Sloan, but I am also a big fan of trying new paint.

We did a show with Kathy in the spring (Junk in the Trunk), and it was probably the best one-day event we’ve ever done. I honestly can’t think of a show where we sold more—it was just wall to wall people all day, and they all seemed to be looking for exactly what we had. We even had to have my dad and Dan bring out additional pieces, and sold almost everything that they brought us during the second half of the day, too. It was basically everything that you dream of for a craft show.

I signed up for Junkstock back in July during the same frenzy that led me to sign up for about six shows at once (at least one a weekend all through August), encouraged by the fact that it was being held during Richmond’s Good Old Days Festival, which was similar to Sterlingfest, minus the art show part of it and plus a couple of parades. Here’s the breakdown of how the weekend went for us:

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Price: This show was $100 for three days (I don’t know why this sign said only Friday and Saturday, because the market was open Sunday, too), which is a reasonable price for the amount of time we spent there and the placement in the show. In the vintage market section, there were about 7-8 tents selling furniture, vintage clothes/jewelry, and antiques, and then on the side street there were some direct sales vendors, crafty items, and information tents.

The hours on Friday were 1 p.m.-6 p.m., and on Saturday and Sunday were 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. I think we probably could have done without the Friday hours (though it rained most of the time, which probably cut down on traffic quite a bit–if it had been nice, the Friday hours probably would have been a lot better).

I was probably the sickest I’d been during my cold–my nose was already running and my aforementioned sinus headache was at it’s absolute worst–of course, right? My mom had to work that day, so I was there by myself, and I couldn’t even make it the whole time. I had to close up the tent at 4 because I was getting soaked and I wanted to try and avoid getting any sicker.

Saturday and Sunday were both beautiful, though we probably could have opened a bit later, since the crowds from the parade didn’t start filtering back towards the market area until after noon on both days.

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Location: Richmond is a little under an hour drive from my house, but unlike the downriver shows we did in August, it’s north of us, which makes the drive automatically better, in my opinion. I’d much rather drive through the countryside than spend an hour on I-75, so I had a lot more fun doing this one. Of course, unlike all of those shows, this one was three days long, so there was a lot more driving time with this one than with the others.

MI Junktiques is in the north part of the downtown area, and the show was held in the park just east of there. We had a nice spot on the grass by the tennis courts. Like I said before, this show resembled Sterlingfest in quite a few ways—carnival food, a midway, craft/vintage show—with the added attraction of a parade and some historical buildings and demonstrations (hence “Good Old Days”). Dan and I took Charlotte out there on Saturday and she had an amazing time. The wristbands were only $20—a little cheaper than Sterlingfest—and the rides that she couldn’t do alone let one of us ride for free, instead of making us buy tickets just to go through and make sure she didn’t get stuck/injured, so that was the real money saver.

I brought the EZ-UP on Saturday and Sunday, too, so we had a similar set-up with a relaxing second tent where one of us could chill while the other one talked to customers. My mom took Charlotte on a bunch of rides at one point and Dan legit fell asleep on the blanket for a good 45 minutes. That’s how nice it was.

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Traffic: There were a ton of people at the festival—I think estimates were around 10,000, but, again, like with a lot of these shows, a good chunk of the traffic were people there to watch the parade or do the rides with their kids. Crowds were slow in the mornings and didn’t really pick up until it was almost time to close—my mom ended up staying open until 7 p.m. on Saturday night because the crowds were just starting to pick up at that time and the other vendors were hanging out, too.


Overall, this was a decent show. We made our booth partway through Saturday, but about broke even when you add up food, travel, and time. The best part of the show was how relaxed the vibe was, and how nice the weather turned out to be on Saturday and Sunday.

My biggest pet peeve was definitely about parking for the show—vendors weren’t given any kind of identification or any special place to park, and the show was so crazy that people were walking for blocks and blocks to get there. When we got there on Saturday, I ended up just blowing off the barricades and driving through a blocked off part to go and park across from the historical buildings, which was the closest I could get to our tent. It was a good thing that no one stopped me—without any kind of identification, I was afraid that we were going to get kicked right out of there. But again, it was pretty chill, so no one seemed to care.

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We were able to set up on Thursday night–I love anytime we can set up the night before– and break down pretty smoothly right after the show ended on Sunday. With such a small number of vintage market vendors, there wasn’t a big hold up getting vehicles in and out.

I should mention that the Good Old Days staff was really on top of their game, too. There was a lot of effort put into making sure that the festival goers had a good experience—there were programs detailing all of the events and times for the weekend, a special barn where the volunteers hung out and where you could get emergency services right away if you needed them, and a huge signpost that listed everything that was going on.

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As far as festivals go, especially if you’re looking for a super fun day as a family, this one would be at the top of my list–it’s late enough in the year that you don’t have to worry about the weather being super hot, there’s plenty of kid food available, the rides are reasonably priced, and there’s a ton to do.

From a vendor perspective, I’m not sure that we’ll do this one again–if I were going to choose between doing the Peachfest in Romeo and doing this show again next year, I’d probably pick the Peachfest (even though it always falls on the weekend of my wedding anniversary). For the Romeo show, people come expecting to shop, whereas at the Junkstock show, it really seemed like the bigger draw was the rides and food.

What did you think of Good Old Days? And what are your favorite September shows to do? I’m very intrigued by the DIY Street Fair in Ferndale coming up the 22-24, and I’ll be sure to share my thoughts on being there as a shopper (I’m really looking forward to picking up a few things for my October favorites post as well). There’s also a show at the Canturbury Village next weekend that I’m hoping to go check out. Danielle will be there with Tillie Jean Market in case you’re interested in shopping for some amazing furniture and decor pieces!

Have a great week everyone!

Talk soon,

Jessie

Friday (Small Business) Favorites: September Edition

**I did not receive any compensation for this post—all of these products were purchased and enjoyed by me/my family (or wrapped and saved for Christmas gifts—yes, I start this early!!).

Good morning friends! I want to start a new thing once a month this fall where I feature some of my recent purchases from my craft show shopping during my favorite season of the year!

I love shopping small and supporting other creative businesses, and I especially love finding things for the people on my Christmas list from small shops and local events. I almost always bring Charlotte home a little present from the shows that she can’t come to (she’s so funny—she’s always like “I want to come to the craft show” and does a little pouty face when I tell her that she can’t. It’s the most adorable thing ever), so you’ll find some children’s items sprinkled through these posts alongside soaps, candles, clothing, food, and gift ideas.

Today I want to feature my friends at Petoskey and Pine, Flint Candle Co., Kosho Krafts, Grow Up Awesome, and Sub Rosa Tea—these are all lovely folks that I met at shows I did during the later part of the summer, and I’m enjoying their products immensely. If you’re looking for some awesome back to school or holiday shopping suggestions, here you go:

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  1. Porcupine Mountains Bar Soap, Petoskey and Pine ($6.50)

I was next to Pierre and Nicole when we did the Auburn Hills Summerfest together back in June, and they were kind enough to offer me a free sample after I gave them a vendor discount on a purchase Nicole made in our booth. Pierre is a certified aromatherapist, and he puts tons of time into researching his process and ingredients. One of my favorite things about these natural, artisanal soaps is that they are inspired by different places all around the state of Michigan, which I always think is super cool. Back in June, I chose the Torch Lake scent because I was planning to take the soap up north with me for the bathroom in the Bellaire house, and Torch Lake is one of our favorite nearby spots to visit. It also smells great and looks beautiful, by the way—all their products do.

Later in the summer, I picked up a bar of the Porcupine Mountains soap at Made in the Mitten in Royal Oak, which stocks Petoskey and Pine products. If you’re looking for a great place to shop handmade this fall, check out Made in the Mitten for sure. As a bonus, it’s right down the street from Nada and Co., where I buy my Annie Sloan chalk paint, so if you have a project in the works, you can kill two birds with one stone, my friends.

Petoskey and Pine has some great gift boxes available for only $30—you know your fallback option for someone on your list is going to be one of those generic gift sets from Bath and Body Works—why not support a small, MI business (that’s also 100% natural) instead? Check them out on their website, Facebook page, and Instagram.

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  1. Peach and Rose Soy Candle, Flint Candle Co ($15)

I love anything peach (flavored, scented, colored—anything, I swear), and when I smelled this candle for the first time at the Shabby Sundays show in June, I had to buy it. This is another item that I took up north with me right away, because my house is  already lousy with candles, but I burned it so much that it was nearly gone by the end of August, so I ordered another one from Lindsay’s Etsy shop as a birthday present to myself (my birthday is August 30—feel free to send gifts next year). Lindsay does the Flint farmer’s market and some other events up that way—but it’s easier for me to place an order on Etsy (though that can be hard with candles because you just want to smell them all!!).

These candles burn perfectly and smell divine. Let’s face it, candles are another common fallback option for gifts—I’m trying to plan ahead so I don’t have to rush to the mall last minute for a generic stocking stuffer! Lindsay throws in a box of matches with every purchase, too, which is super convenient if you’re always losing yours (that’s me, for sure).

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  1. Fox Plush Toy, Kosho Krafts ($12)

Charlotte couldn’t make it out to the St. Augustine show last month, so I bought her this little guy at Lisa’s adorable booth, and Charlotte loved him! She immediately named him Ryder, which I didn’t get right away—she’s only recently begun to name things actual names. Just two months ago she would have named it “fox” and left it at that. I should have known that it was a character from Paw Patrol, though, since she’s obsessed with that show right now. She may have tried to throw him in the Paint Creek one afternoon as we were walking in the woods, but she’s really into cause and effect right now, so I promise it wasn’t out of any bad feelings towards him!

Lisa has a ton of great designs available, and her plush toys are the perfect stocking stuffers. Obviously I still shop at Target for some of Charlotte’s Christmas gifts (I’ve been known to get carried away on Amazon, too—it’s just so easy!!), but I also really like to share my passion for the handmade with her. I hope that she will appreciate all of the hard work that goes into crafting some of these products, and that she will celebrate the creativity and passion behind these special gifts. When we walk around shows together, I love pointing out pieces that I especially love, and she will almost always exclaim “oh, that’s so boo-ful.” Here’s hoping that sweetness will stick around for a bit. I’m dreading the teenager days when she thinks I’m super lame and the last thing she wants to do is get dragged to one of my events.

books are rad grrow up awesome

  1. Books Are Rad T-Shirt, Grow Up Awesome ($28)

I want to start out by stating the obvious–I am not a model, so please don’t judge too harshly! This is kind of a funny one because I really wanted this T-Shirt for Charlotte when I saw Chris’s booth at the Shed 5 Flea in August, but they didn’t have it in her size (I have since ordered it from Chris’s website, since Charlotte is only too happy to wear matching outfits right now, and I have to capitalize on that while I can. I think it’s super cute, but it’s probably actually really dorky–the matching, not the T-shirt). I told my mom about it, and she went off and bought it for me as a birthday gift. My mom is the best.

This T-shirt is perfect for my English professor self, and for Charlotte–so far I’ve successfully inculcated in her a love for the library, reading, and books–I’m confident that she’s a nerdy about it as a little kid can be, which is perfect. To go off topic just a little bit, one of our favorite books to read right now is Rosie Revere, Engineer–it’s a great book in general, but I think you maker mamas out there will particularly love it. Here‘s a link in case you’re interested!

I love these T-shirts because they are super soft, original designs, hand-crafted by a MI artist. What could be better? We all love T-shirts, and Grow Up Awesome makes them for babies, kids, women, and men, so that’s about everyone on your list, right? Check out this adorable onesie for all of you girls with hairy husbands–it almost makes me wish I had a little baby to put it on–almost.

sub rosa peach margarita blend

  1. 0.5 oz Peach Margarita Loose Tea, Sub Rosa Tea ($10/3)

I love tea (and peach things, remember?). My two favorites right now are Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime Peach and Mighty Leaf’s White Orchard, but this Peach Margarita blend is amazing. I haven’t really done loose leaf tea a ton, but I might be sold on this one. Each package of Sub Rosa tea lists the ingredients and a recommended steep time to prevent bitterness, and I love that as I’m measuring out the tea (the package tells you exactly how much to measure out, too) I can see actual chunks of dried fruit—it’s not so pulverized that I can’t even tell what the real ingredients are. I don’t know why I thought that was so cool, but I did. I got a few extra flavors for the tea lovers on my Christmas list. I usually add lemon and honey to my tea, but I seriously don’t even need it with this blend–it’s delicious enough on it’s own! I’m almost done with my little 0.5 oz pouch, and I’ll be ordering more this week, especially with the weather starting to get so chilly.

I also purchased these disposable loose leaf tea bags, which work really well and are only $2/20. There were some fancy mugs and cups available with the steeper, but I didn’t want to invest too much into that equipment right away. Plus, I tend to like whimsical mugs and travel cups—they aren’t always practical, but they are pretty, and that’s what matters, right? I found Sub Rosa at the Finder’s Keeper’s Vintage Market in Belleville, but you can find them on Instagram and Facebook, too (in addition to their website).


I’d love it if you would join me in shopping small this Christmas season! If you’re on Instagram, tag me @wildanddaisy and use the hashtag #metrodetroitmaker to show me what you got! I’m not above stealing a really good idea for a Christmas gift, and I have so much fun spoiling friends and families with handmade finds and all-natural products.

What are your favorite small shops this fall? Any other peach recommendations for me? I’m already working on my list for next month, and I can’t wait to share it with you! In the meantime, leave your comments and recommendations below–I love discovering new small shops!

Talk soon,

Jessie