#metrodetroitmaker Goals for 2018

Good morning girl bosses!

I love this time of year! My slow time of the year corresponds with the New Year, which makes it the perfect time for setting goals, building up inventory, and plotting out how I want the year to go (which also means planning the shows I want to do).

Yes, I said, “setting goals” not “making resolutions.” The thing I don’t like about resolutions is that they often become more like wishes rather than achievable goals. I have no idea what my New Year’s resolution was last year. I probably didn’t make one. But I also didn’t have a focus for the year like I have for this year. Wanna hear what it is?

Mortgage.

Let me back up a little. This post will eventually get around to my business goals for the year, but first I want to give you a little background on what’s going on with us and our personal goals for our lives (it’ll all make sense eventually).

When I started this business, it was to help with our debt snowball. For more on that, hop on over to Dave Ramsey’s website. His stuff is gold if you’re really ready to buckle down and tackle your finances like an adult. If you’re not into delaying gratification, driving an old car, and pretty much never eating out while you’re working his plan, you’ll probably want to stay away.

We’ve been out of debt for about two years now, and our next step has been to tackle our mortgage, but we haven’t been pounding on it like we should be. The reason is partially because I stopped paying us out what I had been so that I could build up the business a bit more—you know, investing in a better camera, a design for the shop, fancy business cards, lots of shows, etc. etc. For a little while, I was toying with the idea of really bulking up my business savings so that I could invest in renting a retail space of my own.

Fast forward to last month, when Dan and I were thinking about and planning for 2018 and doing our budget for the year (yes, the whole year. I’m a huge nerd. I can’t live without that kind of structure).

I had already decided that I wanted to pick a word for the year, and I told Dan about the idea. Looking at our budget at the priorities that we had, it was pretty easy to decide on our word.

We have an aggressive goal of paying down 33% of our mortgage by the end of this year. I say it’s aggressive because the income from my teaching job plus the set amount from Dan’s income that we’ve decided to dedicate to the mortgage will only cover about 18% as it sits right now, which means my business has to contribute an additional 15%. That’s a lot, but I know that I can do it if I stay on pace with what my business produced last year (here’s hoping that I can surpass it and contribute even more).

So how does that affect my goals for 2018?

So glad you asked.

I want to start with my goals for this quarter, which I hope to transition into each quarter (with some tweaks) as the year goes on.

Goal #1: No spend January.

That’s right. I have vowed not to darken the doors of JoAnn’s, Hobby Lobby, or my cluster of beloved thrift stores this month. AT ALL.

I’ll give you a minute to recover.

I’ll admit, this is hard for me. I get a lot of inspiration and creative energy from these places, not to mention materials for my pieces. But you know what else I get? A lot of stuff that I don’t even remember purchasing! Good stuff. Stuff that I could really use.

So that’s what I’m doing. I’m spending my January creating pieces that I already have the materials for, and I have plenty—wreath forms, felt, fabric remnants, paint, furniture, wood scraps, card stock, notions, ribbon, dowels….the list goes on. And you know what else I have a lot of? Half started projects that I never got around to finishing! I have nine dowel lengths painted and ready to be made into fairy wands. I have at least twenty (and probably more) tea wallets already cut out and ready to iron and sew. I have a telephone bench that needs to be painted. I have a wire wreath form spray painted gold and waiting for some felt flowers. I have felt flowers that are all cut out and waiting to be put together. The list goes on and on.

And do I need to go to JoAnn’s in order to complete any of these pieces? No, I don’t.

Not only will I save time and money by not visiting these stores, but I will also be decluttering my work spaces by using up materials that I already have laying around! Just this past week I finished two pillows (the forms have been sitting there for at least 6 months) and several linen heart banners for Valentine’s day from leftover fabric from over a year ago:

heart bannerheart pillows

It’s already the 15th, and I’m feeling the withdrawals and trying to convince myself that the excuses I’m coming up with to head to the craft store are actually really good reasons for me to break my vows and buy a bunch of new stuff. So far, I’ve been able to resist, and I’m putting a lot of obstacles in my own way by making sure that I always have a project in my face that needs to be completed.

One side effect of this experiment that I didn’t anticipate was that my creativity has been engaged in a different way than it has been lately–by forcing myself to use only materials that I have, I’ve been seeing the items in my basement and garage in a whole new light, and seeing new ways to use materials without even having to browse Pinterest for inspiration. It’s been fabulous, and I can’t wait to share more of the pieces I’ve been creating lately!

Goal #2: Stock up my shop.

As I’m going through bins and boxes of materials and pieces that I’ve purchased for one project or another, I’m discovering some amazing things that I no longer need but are going to be great additions to my shop. As of writing this post, I have 113 listings in my shop, and I’m on a mission to get to 200 by the middle of February (that’s about 2.8 listings/day, which is more aggressive than I’ve ever been in the past. The number one thing that I’ve found that consistently drives people to my Etsy shop is consistent postings, so this is a really good goal for me, and one that I actually have time for right now!

Stocking my shop is always on my radar, but during slow times when I’m at least a month out from my new craft show I can really buckle down and focus on getting as much new inventory photographed and ready as possible.

Goal #3: Find new things to try.

This one is still developing. There are at least three new shows that I’m planning to apply to this quarter, and I’m also toying with the idea of renting some space inside a larger co-op type store. There are several places where I’ve thought about doing this in the past, but now there’s a new place opening in downtown Rochester, and that is almost too close not to make it worth it.

I’m still an avid Goal Digger podcast listener, and I’ve recently added The Purpose Show to my playlist, as my new podcast material. It’s a little more focused on motherhood than on small business and goals, but it’s a nice way to round myself out and make sure that I’m focusing on my family and not just on my business for the better part of the day.

I also want to add a few books to my reading list for this year that have to do with my business, and I’m hoping to start with Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In. I haven’t come across any other business related books for the list yet, though I have TONS of fiction books that I’m hoping to get into this year.

I’m also shaking up my morning routine (I’m just now getting back into my routine of heading to Starbucks at 5 a.m. on non-preschool mornings) by adding morning pages to at least a couple of my mornings each week. I typically brain dump into my planner each week, but my planner is a bit tight on space, and my brain is a wild jungle full of scary gibberish which is a little overwhelming for those neat little lines and boxes. I’m hoping that doing a massive dump will help me to streamline so that I don’t overwhelm my poor little planner.


What are your goals for 2018, both personal and business related? Do they overlap at all? I’m hoping to get some of my fire back with a solid goal that will really affect our family’s life going forward into the next two years. When I started this business, that fire was there, and it fueled some major growth!

I’d love to hear from you about some of your strategies for a productive year, month, and week, too! Do you bullet journal? Use a planner? Do morning pages? How do you release all that extra “stuff” from your brain so that you can be free to concentrate fully on the most important tasks for your week?

Here’s hoping to a wonderful January and an even better 2018! Get your goals on, girl bosses!

Talk soon,

Jessie

My Creative Entrepreneur Identity Crisis

I’ve already shared with you a very brief snapshot of my identity issues in my first post, but I really want to dive deeper into it today. The reason for this is partly because I think we all struggle with this to some extent as creative entrepreneurs, and partly because I think I might just need to get it out on paper (or screen) in order to deal with it completely.

Fun fact: I actually do a lot of writing by hand, especially my first drafts. A lot of these posts come from my own journal entries, or excerpts of them. Someone once told me that when you type words, you’re writing with your head; when you physically write them down, you’re writing with your heart.

I’m trying to avoid talking about this. Can you tell? I’ve basically been writing versions of this post in my journal for about the past four years, but I’ve been really resistant to even talk about it to anyone but Dan. So this is a bit of a leap for me–so much so that I even wrote this post in two parts, having given up on it back in June after I wrote the first part, and then coming back to it recently (but still a little while before I could bring myself to hit the “publish” button).

6/21/2017

I think, to some extent, I’ve always been creative. I did an exercise a little while ago that asked the question “How would most people describe you if they only had to use one word?” and I immediately wrote down “talented,” but “creative” would be a close second. I was really into art and music in high school. In college, I got into theater (incidentally, I still use a lot of the skills I learned building sets when I’m building my furniture). After Dan and I bought our house, I started to get creative with decorating it, since we were on a budget and trying to get out of debt. When people ask me to help with things like weddings or events at church, there’s almost always a creative element to what they are asking me to do, because that’s what I’m good at.

It feels hard to talk about this, though. I think so often, especially as women, we are conditioned to be humble and defer to others and say things like “oh, anyone can do that.” It’s hard for us to take pride in the things that we are good at without feeling like we are hardcore bragging on ourselves. So many times I’ve given a variation of “anyone could do that” in response to people telling me I’m talented, when the reality, when it comes to my particular vision for the furniture that I recreate, is this: someone else could do something like it, but no one could do exactly “it” because I found the piece, saw its potential, and carried out my design (sometimes through several revisions).

I think realizing that is so important to realizing your value as a creative entrepreneur and realizing that the things you as an individual have to offer to the market and to the creative community have value as well. Girl bosses, #metrodetroitmakers, no one else can do exactly what you do!

Here’s the other part of my identity crisis. As silly as it sounds (or maybe it doesn’t sound all that silly to you–if you’re reading this, maybe you feel the same way), being a creative entrepreneur doesn’t feel serious to me, especially when you compare that to being a college professor. Or a doctor, medical engineer, EMT, nurse, attorney, or executive, which I happen to be surrounded by in both my family and my husband’s family. I feel like an underachiever extraordinaire when I hang out with these people and hear about travels to Russia and Africa, emergency C-sections, rubbing elbows with Dick Cheney, or saving someone’s life with CPR and a plastic pen.

Often, I feel like a hobbyist rather than a businesswoman, especially because all I have is an online shop, an occasional weekend outdoor booth, and a garage full of broken furniture that hardly anyone sees as having any value (that is, until I finish a piece).


Note: The above all pretty much came out without a lot of self-editing–drawn from journal entries and emotions and comments that have built up over the past few years. The problem is, once I had it down, I was like “No one will ever want to read this.” So I put it away for a bit. Then early in July I came back to it.

journaling

photo credit: Pexels

7/9/2017

None of these issues are helped at all by well-meaning comments and questions like “how’s your little business going?” or “that furniture painting thing; are you still doing that?” My business isn’t little—many months I bring in as much or more than Dan does with his “serious” finance career—but it feels little when compared with something that is easily recognized and firmly established, like a medical or law practice. Those comments and questions are part of the reason why I’ve gotten in my own way when it comes to my business, and part of the reason why I’ve held on so long to this idea of a career as a college professor when, in reality, that is looking less and less like my best option for fulfilling my career and life goals.  

Luckily, Dan is my biggest supporter, and he’s constantly telling me how much he values everything I’m doing to try and make this business work. I don’t think I’d be pursuing this seriously at all if he weren’t on board with the idea. He’s always told me that he wants to work at his job and provide everything we need so that I can do what I’m most passionate about, whether that’s teaching, running my business, or raising our family. The hardest part for me has been figuring out exactly what I want to pursue—again, partly because of my own identity issues.

As a Christian, it’s super hard not to get wrapped up in defining myself by what I do, or how much I make, or whether or not I have a white slipcover sofa like all the other home décor bloggers out there do (or at least, seem to). The thing is, when I’m in my garage, painting and listening to worship music or podcasts, or when I’m out with Charlotte, exploring the park or playing at the library, or even when I’m in front of a computer screen blogging or invoicing or lesson planning, it’s not that hard to rest in my identity in Christ. I belong to Him first and foremost, and the most important part of my identity is that I am His child.

But that’s hard to talk about (for me, anyway). It would be weird as a response to the question “what do you do?” And when I’m in my booth during the summer, or in front of the classroom in the fall and winter, or sitting around the dinner table with family, it’s the last thing on my mind. I’m trying to navigate and respond to whichever identity is uppermost in my mind at that moment, whether it’s business owner, professor, wife, or mother.

It’s really easy for me (and I think for all of us creative entrepreneurs) to think that things will be better when I make X amount of money from my creative business, or when I have X amount of followers on social media, or when I have my physical store, or…or…or…

But I’ve met goals before. Goals on Etsy, goals for inventory, goals for the number of shows I’d do in a given year. I’ve exceeded plenty of goals, too—goals for the year, goals for a particular show, goals for income in a set period of time…and exactly none of those times was my overall happiness or sense of identity in the least affected. At the end of the day, they were just numbers, or dates, or pieces finished. They were just arbitrary things. I still fall into the trap of thinking that the next goal achieved will be different, somehow, but getting all of this out on paper helps me to keep that feeling in check.

So where does that leave me in my struggle with my identity as a wife and mama, girl boss, and part-time English professor? I’m not sure. I guess my best answer is: I’m working on it. It’s funny, because in almost every other area of my life, I actually feel ok. I’m a natural introvert, and I’ve always struggled with that part of my personality—I just work better in small groups or one-on-one, and I feel a bit awkward interacting with large groups of people (unless I’m in charge, like in front of a classroom—then I’m in my element, for some reason). I’ve struggled with my body image too, and I always feel like people are judging me for being super unhealthy or unattractive. I’ve spent a lot of time worrying about what people think of my personal style, or the way that I parent, or the things that I believe.

I think all that has really started to change over the past couple of months. Suddenly, I’m not really thinking about everyone else so much. I’m oddly focused on what’s best for our family, what’s best for my business, and what’s best for me. What other people think seems so much more insignificant to me now than it ever has. It’s not that I don’t care at all about other people—I do. I just don’t care what they think.

Maybe that means that resolving my identity crisis when it comes to what I should “be” or “do” is right around the corner. Fingers crossed!

 

Do you struggle with the same things I do? How does your family respond to your small business, dreams, or goals? What do you see as your primary identity, and how did you get to that point? Tell me about it in the comments below—I’d love to get some more perspective on this!! As always, feel free to email me at metrodetroitmaker@gmail.com, or follow me on Instagram and use the #metrodetroitmaker to connect with the community.

Talk soon,

Jessie