4 Things That Are Upping My Girl Boss Game This Summer

Being a girl boss is hard work, ladies—especially when you add being a wife, mama, girlfriend, dog mom, homeowner, personal chef, and all of the other things that we ladies are constantly juggling. Hard as it is at times, certain habits and rhythms can seriously help make things a little easier.

Today I’m sharing some things that are really working for me this summer in an effort to encourage you to develop your own rhythms as we figure out this girl boss stuff together. Thanks for joining me this morning! Here’s what’s working for me right now:

Getting up Early

This is the single biggest thing that has been helping me this summer. I’ve been getting up around 5 a.m. every morning and heading to Starbucks to work for two hours before Dan leaves for work around 8. It’s been immensely helpful. I’ve been using this time to schedule social media posts, write for my blog, work on content for my Etsy listings, answer emails, and plan my days/weeks.

While I don’t come to Starbucks every single day for this, I like leaving the house in the morning as often as I can, because I don’t get distracted sitting here in a coffee shop—there’s no laundry, no dirty dishes, and no half-finished project sitting right there. It’s much easier to focus on completing these tasks if I can sit down and power through them for two hours every morning. In addition to those distractions, Charlotte is an early riser like her mama, and even though Dan is home, she will inevitably yell for me to help her with something every ten minutes or so, which is even worse than that chair sitting there. With a three year old around, I definitely get more work done when I can be away for a bit.

distractions

Please tell me that some of your kitchens look like this, too. It will make me feel so much better!!

When I leave Starbucks to head home, I can feel good about taking the morning “off” to hang out with Charlotte, get some housework done, and get back to work later during her nap. I usually use my early Monday mornings to plan the week and make a list of the big projects I need to complete (I also browse upcoming estate and garage sales that I might want to check out and make a note of those). Every morning before I leave to go home, I plan out my nap time priorities for the day, as well as any tasks that I want to complete that night after dinner. Especially during the hectic parts of the craft show season, I usually work for at least two hours after dinner, when Dan is around to spend time with Charlotte.

I’ll confess, I’m a morning person, and the thought of getting up at 5 a.m. to start the day being productive is sickeningly exciting to me. I’ll also confess that Charlotte has a hard time falling asleep during the day without me staying in bed with her, so I almost always take a short nap at the beginning of her nap, and I get to recoup a bit of my energy then.

Setting Goals

I kind of started doing this by accident early this summer—I think it might have come about as a result of something that I listened to on the Goal Digger podcast, but I know I was also driven and working out some frustrations in some other areas of my life when I decided to set a goal for how much inventory I would have ready for the Royal Oak Vintage Artisan Market at the beginning of June 2017. I had never set a similar goal before, so I tried it. I told myself I would have at least $1000 of inventory ready for the show (then managed to exceed my goal by quite a bit), and lo and behold, we made nearly $1000. It was crazy. I got fired up about it, and I saw really amazing results happen every time as I started to set new goals (big and small) throughout the rest of the summer.

I have this chalkboard out in the garage where I keep track of my inventory progress before a big show:

goal chalkboard

This was my progress tracker as I was prepping for the Royal Oak Vintage Artisan Market.

One small goal I set for myself at the Saline show was to make 10 sales. Again, I had never done this before, but it really kept me motivated to talk to customers and try to engage with their needs during a show when I might have been a little more withdrawn and down because it wasn’t what I was expecting. For a show like Sterlingfest, I set number goals for my email list as well as sales goals for each day.

It’s probably a psychological thing, but I feel a lot more accomplished when I meet a goal I set, even when it’s a modest one, than I do when everything just goes really well but I didn’t necessarily have a goal I was working towards.

I try to set goals for myself when it comes to screen time, too—when I set a goal not to look at my phone until 3 p.m., for example (after answering all my emails and scheduling all my posts in the morning, of course), I find that I’m so much more productive throughout the day than I would be if I were looking at my phone for 5-10 minutes every hour.

Journaling

This one is tied to both setting goals and to getting up early—my work journal gives me a place to record most of these goals and to jot down notes about what went wrong and what went right along the way. I use this journal for my work notes:

make it happen journal

I’d really like to invest in the Make it Workbook, but I should probably finish this journal first—I have a slight journal obsession, probably as a result of being an English professor and avid writer, and the number of mostly empty notebooks and journals I have lying around is frankly embarrassing.

Anyway, back to journaling. My journaling is definitely linked to getting up early, too—before I was doing this getting up early thing, I never felt like I had time to journal because I had to get all of this other stuff out of the way and work on projects during naptime.

Another confession: I’ve always been a journaler, so getting back into this habit wasn’t hard for me. I love looking back at where I’ve been and seeing how far I’ve come. I have a few other markers now that I’ve been doing this for about four years, but my journal is always the most tangible for me. I used to journal every day in high school and college, and I’ve missed it a lot as a (relatively) new mama. Most days, my work journal is just notes for projects, to-do lists, productivity and time tracking, and notes for Etsy listings, but I try to get my morning pages done while I’m away in the morning, too.

work journal

Side note: Starbucks just started playing Where My Girls At? and I legit started dancing in my seat. Welcome back feels from 1999. I’ve missed you.

Events

Honestly, because of the goals I’ve been setting and the amount of inventory I’ve been producing, even my so-so events have been successful this summer. A slow event gives me time to plan and think and be creative when it comes to selling and forming customer relationships, and the great events give me the resources to save for my shop, pay for future events, and build my email list.

email list example

Speaking of email lists, my email list is probably the thing that I’m most proud of this summer, and it’s another idea that I got from the Goal Digger podcast. I’ve always passed out business cards at my events, but I’ve never asked people for their email addresses, which seems crazy to me now. I’ve also started using MailChimp to send out a monthly newsletter to my email list, which helps keep me in front of the customers that I connected most strongly with at my shows. It feels really good to slowly build that list every month and know that I have contact information for a growing number of people that liked my work so much they gave me their information so that we could stay in touch. I’m kicking myself for not doing this sooner, but at least I started now. With at least a year to go before there’s a possibility of realizing my goal for a physical store, I have plenty of time to build a following and get potential customers interested and engaged with what I’m doing on a regular basis.


While these things are going really well this summer, there are still a few things that I’m spending a lot of time on that aren’t going so great—things like time management, social media, and inventory organization. Maybe a post on these things and how I’m trying to work on them is in my future.

What do you struggle with most as a creative girl boss? What’s working for you this summer? Let me know in the comments below. I’d love to hear from you!

Talk soon,

Jessie

One thought on “4 Things That Are Upping My Girl Boss Game This Summer

  1. Pingback: How to Deal When an Event Isn’t Going Well | #metrodetroitmaker

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